Alan Mulally, the retired president and chief executive offer of the Ford Motor Company, was ranked the third on Fortune’s “World’s Greatest Leaders” after Pope Francis and Angela Merkel. In my opinion, he is a charismatic leader in the automobile retail company. In 2006 when the Ford Motor Company was facing the biggest annual loss of $12.7 billion in over a hundred year of operation, Mulally took the leadership and turned around the situation. Ever since 2009, the company has posted annual profit under Mulally’s leadership. There are three crucial qualities he possessed and had improved the performance of the Ford Motor Company, which are positive, organized, and forward-thinking.

I believe the most important quality Alan Mulally possess is the “positive” leadership style he had. It seems simple and easy, but it is crucial to implement under difficult circumstances. Creating a supportive atmosphere is not easy especially when the company is on the edge of bankruptcy. Mulally stayed positive and tried to convey the positive image to his employees. He played a motivative role in helping the company move forward.

Mulally was also an organized and forward-thinking person. He believed the importance of understanding the world would benefit in doing any kind of business. Therefore, he managed to have Business Review Plan meetings to talk about the current global business environment with leaders and leadership team. He preferred to analyze and predict the trend beforehand.

In a conclusion, positive, organized, and forward-thinking qualities are only three of the many qualities Alan Mulally had as a charismatic leader at the Ford Motor Company. He helped the firm to survive in the difficult situation was remarkable. They are good qualities of how to become a charismatic leader that we need to study from.

 

http://fortune.com/2014/03/20/worlds-50-greatest-leaders/

http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/leading-in-the-21st-century-an-interview-with-fords-alan-mulally

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